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  1. Ignatius Press Novels

    An Interview with Roger Thomas

    August 21, 2014 3:08 pm Leave a Comment

    Roger Thomas is a lifelong Michigan resident, has been married to his wife Ellen since 1981. They have six grown children and eight grandchildren. He is a self-employed computer consultant. He loves reading, and his favorite authors include C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Rudyard Kipling, and P.G. Wodehouse. He has had… Read more »

    Tags: homosexuality IVF love marriage Roger Thomas same-sex attraction The Accidental Marriage

  2. Publishing contract

    Busy Bees!

    August 14, 2014 3:10 pm 8 Comments

    Our readers may have noticed a sudden lag in our blog posting… The reason is that we have been working tirelessly to bring you great new books this fall! We have some new novels coming out like The Accidental Marriage by Roger Thomas, Iota by T.M. Doran, and some great… Read more »

    Tags: getting published Iota new Ignatius books The Accidental Marriage

  3. Ignatius Press Novels

    IP Novels Digest: Tobit’s Dog

    August 1, 2014 11:24 am Leave a Comment

    More great reviews on Tobit’s Dog!   ”Have you ever reached the end of a book to find yourself feeling a little sad that it was finished; as if you were saying goodbye to good friends? That is how I felt as I closed Tobit’s Dog, by Michael Nicholas Richard….Tobit’s Dog is a novel… Read more »

    Tags: blogs reviews Tobit's Dog

  4. Dan at Ignatius

    Conferring about the Catholic Literary Imagination

    July 30, 2014 12:53 pm Leave a Comment

    I really need to do a round-up of all of the reams that have been poured out about the Catholic and otherwise Christian literary landscape since this site began and we pointed out a bunch of Catholic upstarts (not forgetting ourselves!). Without going into it all, though, see how much… Read more »

    Tags: Alice McDermott Catholic culture Catholic literature conferences Dana Gioia novelists Ron Hansen Tobias Wolff

  5. Dorothy Cummings McLean

    A Wifing Housewrite

    July 30, 2014 12:38 pm Leave a Comment

    Lately I’ve been reading nothing except Polish in Four Weeks by Marzena Kowalska, A Pocket Full of Rye by Dame Agatha Christie and, above all, Home Comforts: the Art & Science of Keeping House by Cheryl Mendelson.  And I’ve been doing little except housework because when I consulted the Great Cheryl… Read more »

    Tags: Agatha Christie Alice Thomas Ellis Catholic literature Cheryl Mendelson conferences festivals Marzena Kowalska reading reviews Scotland

  6. Meryl Amland

    Take me to The City!

    July 29, 2014 4:55 pm 3 Comments

    THE-CITY-CoverAs some of you may already know, I absolutely love Dean Koontz’ Odd Thomas series, but I tend to stay away from his other novels because of the gore/horror element. However, I was intrigued as I read a few reviews on Amazon about his latest novel The City. Some were saying “It is unlike any other Koontz novel” or “If you’re looking for horror, you’ll be disappointed.” So, I decided to spend the $12 on the Kindle version and give it a try… and I was not disappointed. I kid you not when I say that this book is one of the best novels I have ever read!

    The story is told from the perspective of Jonah Kirk at age 54, reflecting on his life as a child in the 60’s. Little Jonah lives in a walk-up apartment in The City with his young mother, who sings at Jazz clubs and waitresses at Woolworth’s, and his no-good father, who is an aspiring chef at a local restaurant. When Jonah’s father decides to leave Jonah and his mother, Jonah believes that his life has changed for the better. Now, he can learn to play the piano like he always wanted and he doesn’t have to listen to his dad’s nagging wife stories.

    But after meeting a lady named Pearl, who claims to be The City incarnate, Jonah’s life becomes a tangle of prophetic dreams and dangerous people. With the help of his friend and neighbor, Mr. Yoshioka, he will embark on an adventure involving crime and conspiracy that will change his life forever.

    I found the book to be a combination of A Boy’s Life by Robert McGammon and To Kill a Mockingbird  by Harper Lee. I enjoyed reading about the adventures of a little boy and his great wonder over all things simple and beautiful. Jonah’s character is wonderfully loveable with his appreciation of good music, his innocence, and his sense of humor. And Koontz’ Catholicism is ingeniously interwoven within Jonah’s family and within The City herself. But it is definitely not a tale for the faint of heart. The story does take place during the turbulent 1960’s, after all. There is great suffering that many characters must endure, and Jonah learns that you can either let suffering eat you from the inside out or you can let it mold you into a greater person:

    Read more »

    Tags: Dean Koontz Odd Thomas The City The Neighbor

  7. Terrapin

    Ignatius Summer Novel Sale!!

    July 22, 2014 8:00 am Leave a Comment

    Several great IP Novels are on sale through August 31! Enjoy the rest of your summer with these great titles:  

    Tags: Ceremony of Innocence Dayspring Do No Harm Everywhere in Chains Fire of Love Ida Elisabeth Manalive Poor Banished Children sale Shadows and Images Terrapin Toward the Gleam

  8. T. M. Doran

    The Creative Seed

    July 15, 2014 11:48 am Leave a Comment

    When we encounter the works of Dickens, Waugh, Eliot, and O’Connor; Beethoven, Mozart, and Tchaikovsky; Da Vinci, Rembrandt, and Picasso, we are amazed at the abundance of creativity, far surpassing that of “mere mortals”, art so sublime, so beautiful, so moving, that we can only marvel at it. So why… Read more »

    Tags: art creativity writing

  9. Ignatius Press Novels

    IP Novels Digest

    July 10, 2014 11:21 am Leave a Comment

    Arthur Powers, author of The Book of Jotham, reviews Tobit’s Dog: “You should read this book,” Marguerite – the owner of In His Name, our local Catholic book store – told me. She has started a section of North Carolina writers, and Richard’s book was right next to mine. She knows books, and… Read more »

    Tags: Arthur Powers bloggers blogs links reviews The Book of Jotham The Leaves Are Falling Tobit's Dog

  10. bradbury-

    “Joy is the grace we say to God.”

    July 3, 2014 4:27 pm 5 Comments

    I recently read Ray Bradburybradbury-’s beautiful book Dandelion Wine. It is incredibly evocative of what being a child is like. I found myself pausing repeatedly in my reading as Bradbury’s prose jostled memories of my own childhood: the first realization that, yes, I was a real person and really truly alive; walking in the moonlight during a warm night and suddenly going from comfort to fear; the first real awareness of mortality; the joy of being allowed to stay up late and share in the world of adults; the foods, activities, music that come with summer.

    Ray Bradbury uses the metaphor of dandelion wine to represent capturing summer in a bottle, one that can be opened and shared even in the dead of winter to awaken those remembrances of joy and warmth. Bradbury’s writing is itself a bottle of that wine—I’m not sure how he did it, but he captured magic with his words. He himself humbly described how he felt when reading his own work: “Every so often, late at night, I come downstairs, open one of my books, read a paragraph and say, My God. I sit there and cry because I feel that I’m not responsible for any of this. It’s from God. And I’m so grateful, so, so grateful.” Read more »

    Tags: Bradbury fantasy reviews

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